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Theatre to the Point

Theatre #tothepoint for DC, MD & VA

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Nathan Scavilla

Theatre to the Point Best of 2017: Community Theatre

As the first year of Theatre to the Point comes to a close we wanted to recognize the best of what we saw in 2017. We were paying audience members at a limited number of shows this year and in the future as our site grows we expect these yearly reviews to be a far more comprehensive overview of the best our region had to offer.

Best Musical:

Aida – Reston Community Players

We were blown away by the technical quality of this production that we described as “must see community theatre”

Review

Best Play:

A Bright New Boise – Silver Spring Stage

It’s been a year where local theatres have embraced plays with some pretty dark themes and none were more enjoyable than Silver Spring Stage exploring the rapture inside the break room of a Hobby Lobby.

Review

Best Value Show:

Aida – Reston Community Players

With ticket prices set at $27 we wondered if this show could reach value. Director, Andrew JM Regiec, oversaw a show that smashed that price, scoring 71/100 for a $42 value.

Best Actor in a Musical:

Matt Wetzel, Emmett (Legally Blonde) – Silhouette Stages

Best Actress in a Musical:

Sherry Benedek, Sister Mary Robert (Sister Act) – Cockpit in Court

Best Actor in a Play:

Brendan Murray, Will (A Bright New Boise) – Silver Spring Stage

Best Actress in a Play:

Maura Suilebhan, Anna (A Bright New Boise) – Silver Spring Stage

Best Director of a Musical:

Susan Thornton, Willy Wonka the Musical – Other Voices

Best Director of a Play:  

Bill Hurlbut, Omnium Gatherum – Silver Spring Stage

Best Music Director:

Nathan Scavilla, Sister Act – Cockpit in Court

Best Choreographer:

Kendall Sigman, Hairspray – The Fredericktowne Players

Best Set Design:

Andrew JM Regiec & Dan Widerski, Aida – Reston Community Players

Best Costume Design:

Charlotte Marson, Aida – Reston Community Players

Best Lighting Design:

Steve Knapp & Jim McGuire, Willy Wonka – Other Voices

Best Sound Design:

Robert Pike, A Bright New Boise – Silver Spring Stage

Check out all of our reviews here.

Review: Sister Act

Sister Act

Sister Act was a box office smash for Whoopi Goldberg on the big screen back in 1992 and the Musical of the same name has been incredibly popular with theatre audiences all over the world since it opened in London’s West End in 2010 before moving to Broadway a year later. It is opening weekend at the Community College of Baltimore County and as the curtain is drawn on this Cockpit in Court production we sit back eager to see if Director, Choreographer and Costume Coordinator, Tom Wyatt, can successfully juggle all these roles.

The action is set in the 1970s and the costumes do for the most part convey that era although not in a particularly cohesive manner. It’s a slightly lackluster start to the show as Deloris Van Cartier (Rikki Howie Lacewell) takes the lead on Take Me to Heaven and is backed up by Michelle (Amy Luchey) and Tina (Lacy Comstock). Lacewell sings well throughout but her acting choices lack a certain honesty, too often falling in to the trap of trying to play it funny with her delivery and this contributes to too many of the comedic moments missing the mark.

We meet Mother Superior (played with skill and restraint by Jane C. Boyle) and with the high energy of all the other Sisters in the convent, Boyle manages to shine in an understated way. The performance showcases the lovely tone in her voice in a role that could have easily fallen flat under a less experienced actress.  As we transition to the convent we are greeted by the Set Designer, G. Maurice Conn’s, impressive two story set that has an upper platform (which is used disappointingly sparingly) and working doors on the ground level. Eddie (Troy Haines-Hopper) is the hero of our story and he displays the velvety smoothness to his voice on I Could be That Guy. While his crooning is just a little pitchy at times it’s easy to forgive as he brings a sweetness and charm to the role. Again, however, the comedic timing of the line delivery means too many potentially laugh out loud moments are unfulfilled. Just as act one seems to be meandering its’ way to the intermission the whole production reaches new heights with Raise Your Voice (featuring excellent lighting) and Take Me to Heaven (Reprise). The Nuns are truly the strength of this show and the singing, dancing and excitement they bring to these two numbers leave us invigorated and ready for act two.

The energy level is maintained throughout the second act but the quality in all aspects of the production is a story of highs and lows. Wyatt has some scenes executed with near precision while others fall well short of this high standard. The choreography for the Nuns is fun, visually stimulating and full of energy, while the men’s numbers, particularly Lady in the Long Black Dress, are awkward in execution. Wyatt gets credit for the pace of the show as set changes occur at great speed and even though the action is broken up with blackouts they are quick and forgiving. Isolating areas of the stage as part of the lighting design could have simplified some of these changes and it was certainly achievable as designer, Kasey Conn, showed in the first act. The sound issues are the low point of the evening with mics consistently cutting out. This was most frequently an issue for Monsignor O’Hara (Thom Sinn) and it is to his and the rest of the casts’ credit that they persevered and made their voices heard. The costumes peak with the Nuns and the added flair to their outfits (and the stunning costume for Deloris in the finale) but lose their way in Fabulous Baby Reprise with the ensemble appearing to be in wrong decade in their 1960s swing dresses and their hot pink clashing horribly when the men join in wearing red.

Music Director, Nathan Scavilla, has done a creditable job with this group and the live seven piece orchestra sound fine throughout and add to the sense of occasion (especially as the Pope appears from within their midst). The Nuns sound great together on all of their songs but the exceptional vocal of the night belongs to Sherry Benedek as she truly takes us to church in her role as Sister Mary Robert. She finds a truth, naivety and a childlike sense of adventure and we believe every word she sings of The Life I Never Led. That investment is missing when Curtis Jackson (Jake Stuart) arrives in the final moments to kill Deloris – the tension just isn’t there as the stakes of the situation just never seem high enough.

There are some genuinely physically funny scenes as Curtis’ men chase the Nuns through the ground level doors and later as they are taken down in the conflict at the convent. Overall these moments, along with some impressive highlights musically, don’t quite do enough to make this review a strong recommendation…but these Nuns are worth making the effort to come and see and the show finishes on an absolute high as they Spread the Love Around. We can’t help but wonder if the production responsibilities had embraced a similar mantra if some of the inconsistencies would have been overcome.

#tothepoint Rating: 61/100

You can view a full breakdown of the allocated points here.

Ticket Price: $22

Value Review: $0

With our scoring system and our unique value for money guide we rate this show at $22 meaning it reached the expected value. Sister Act continues at Cockpit in Court until August 6th.

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