One Man Two Guvnors

Richard Bean’s adaptation of a Servant of Two Masters won The Late Late Show’s James Corden a Tony back in 2012 and this British comedy is starting to gain popularity in theatres around the country. As the audience takes their places at the two sided Silver Spring Stage we are welcomed by a 3 piece skiffle band that are positioned off the stage between the seating sections.

Director, William T. Fleming also takes on the role of Set Designer and has the task of taking us to multiple locations around 1963 Brighton. All the sets look period appropriate and during the changes we are entertained by the skiffle band that is joined by a different member of the cast to serenade us. Unfortunately the positioning of the band makes it difficult to focus on them and not the moving of set pieces – at times they feel like background music for the changes rather than demanding our attention. The transitions are smooth enough that this isn’t in itself an issue but some of the comedic nature of the lyrics is a little lost on the distracted audience. Fleming also utilizes two video screens at various moments in the show; effectively as a window in the opening scene, and less so as a corridor in the pub and as outdoor scenery at other times. They never detract from the production but it does feel like a ‘we’ve got them so we’re going to use them’ based decision rather than truly believing they enhance the production.

Focus is required from the opening scene as the convoluted plot of love, murder, cross dressing and double crossing is unveiled.  We are in the house of Charlie Dench (Kevin Dykstra) at the engagement party for his daughter, Pauline (Lena Winter) and Alan Dangle (Daniel Riker). Dykstra is very good as the down to earth Charlie and he clearly understands his role as his moments of composing himself when discussing his wife or when attempting to understand the complexities of the science behind twins are funny because they are understated. He plays the character with just enough naivety to explain just why his daughter is so much of a ditz. Winter plays Pauline with a childlike wonder and she is vocally and physically funny to watch throughout.  Riker is all arms and legs as he prances around the stage flamboyantly as the wannabe actor, Alan, and his exchanges with Pauline are always entertaining.

We are quickly introduced to the ‘One Man’ as Francis Henshall (Nathan Tatro) breaks up the party with news that his guvnor, Roscoe/Rachel Crabbe (Kristen Pilgrim) is still alive. It’s an immensely likable performance from Tatro who looks like he is having a huge amount of fun on stage and he has us on his side from the start. Pilgrim plays the intentionally transparent gender switch well and it’s a performance full of amusing mannerisms but her delivery is too fast, especially in the first act. We meet the second guvnor, Stanley Stubbers (Anderson Wells) who is also too rapid with his dialogue. There are numerous times when the laughter is just forming in the back of our throats when it is cut off. This sets the tone for a show where the audience should be hysterically laughing out loud and turns it into one of more internal enjoyment. Wells plays all the dramatic moments of his character without missing a beat and his deep resonating voice in some of the dead pan comic moments is genuinely funny.

Maybe it’s this lack of energy from the audience that prevents the end of act one reaching a true crescendo. Fleming could afford to demand double the pace (at least) from his actors in a scene that was funny but could be elevated to chaotic hilarity. The back and forth between Francis and elderly waiter, Alfie (Lenora Spahn) and a poor unsuspecting audience member are hugely entertaining but with more drive it could be a scene we are laughing about long after we leave the theatre. There are also ongoing references to the horrors of living in Australia throughout the show and Fleming chooses to present these with each actor breaking away from the scene to face the audience and there is a dramatic lighting change as the lines are delivered. In a more conventional show this might have been a bold and effective choice but in a production where the 4th wall is obliterated with regularity it just comes across as odd. Maria V. Bissex successfully conveys the 60s theme through her costumes and for the most part the dialect coach, Pauline Griller-Mitchell, helps us believe we are on the other side of the pond.

Fleming gets good performances from all his actors and there are some very funny scenes (Tatro’s fight with himself is only outdone by the hilarious mating ritual of Pilgrim and Wells) Overall the pacing issues are holding the show back but with the benefit of opening weekend under their belt it is certainly possible this production will get stronger and surpass the value of the ticket.

#tothepoint Rating 61/100

You can view a full breakdown of the allocated points here.

Ticket Price: $25

Value Rating: -$3

With our scoring system and our unique value for money guide we rate this show at $22. Tickets are available on Groupon and Gold Star for $16.50. One Man, Two Guvnors continues at Silver Spring Stage until July 29th.